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Welcome to my repository of hipsteries, rockets and hacks.

curated by @rodnylobos
Hybrid UX/Visual | Creative Coder

Professor Noam Chomsky visits Google Cambridge to answer the following questions from Googlers:

1. Your early view of the potential abuse of the Internet as a political medium seemed to convey a wait and see attitude. How has your view evolved and where do you think the balance of power is headed?2:43

2. What is the most interesting insight the science of Linguistics has revealed but that the public at large seems not to know about or appreciate? 13:00

3. In “Hopes and Prospects” you mention your colleague Kenneth Hale and his work with Native Americans. In your opinion, how important is the problem of language extinction? That is, how important is it - for humanity to preserve the current level of linguistic diversity? 18:03

4. Can you comment on the contribution of research in statistical natural language processing to linguistics? 30:00

5. What, in your opinion, are the most effective strategies for building a more just and peaceful world? And in your view, what are the most significant takeaways from Occupy, the Arab Spring, and the Ukrainian “Euromaidan” uprising? 35:11

6. In “Hopes and Prospects” you compare Obama with Bush2. It’s 4 years later now. What would you say today? 41:39

via Talks at Google

Art of the Prank: Community Service - Steve Powers 2002
Graffiti, in case anyone missed the point, is a marking on a surface. Graffiti eradication is typically the application of paint over the marking of the surface. In terms of “damage,” there is no evidence that one layer of paint is less destructive than the one beneath it. In the course of painting over graffiti, the eradicators create a unique marking of their own that writers call “buffmarks.” Roll along the highways of LA and see thousands of buffmarks, each as visually compelling as the next and the last, each with a story to tell.
The story is this: One person wrote a name to show he was there. Another person was threatened enough by the declaration of existence that he painted over his name. The splotch of paint that covers the name becomes a tag itself. It sits on the wall and testifies to the presence of two people. One person is a so-called criminal, one person is a so-called activist, and both are equal in their need to be recognized. One person has fame but faces jail; one person gets support and accolades from the community but wants fame. The wall could care less about either of them; It just gets fatter with paint.
Community Service is a project that poses the questions: If graffiti is painted in a way that serves a community is it wrong? And, why aren’t activists that make more of a mess painting over graffiti than the graffiti itself considered criminals?
I volunteered to paint over graffiti around the city, using my own supplies, to exploit the hypocrisy that people who put down one layer of paint are hated while the people who put down the next layer are celebrated. At the same time my mission was to paint my name in a bold and subtle style to demonstrate the effectiveness of getting over in a civic minded way. The answer, I suspected from the start, was the only thing more pointless than painting graffiti is painting over it.
Graffiti is far from pointless, though. It is an adventure that employs innovation and critical thinking skills all in one stylish line. Painting over it isn’t pointless either; it creates business and opportunities for hundreds of people all over LA.
There is an intense symbiotic relationship between the writers and the buffers, and at the end of the day, if everyone has done his job, One person has created a mark and another has covered it. So it is pointless, except for the decimal amount that graffiti abatement generates for the economy. That point moves steadily to the right morning, noon, and night.
via exteriorsurface

Art of the Prank: Community Service - Steve Powers 2002

Graffiti, in case anyone missed the point, is a marking on a surface. Graffiti eradication is typically the application of paint over the marking of the surface. In terms of “damage,” there is no evidence that one layer of paint is less destructive than the one beneath it. In the course of painting over graffiti, the eradicators create a unique marking of their own that writers call “buffmarks.” Roll along the highways of LA and see thousands of buffmarks, each as visually compelling as the next and the last, each with a story to tell.

The story is this: One person wrote a name to show he was there. Another person was threatened enough by the declaration of existence that he painted over his name. The splotch of paint that covers the name becomes a tag itself. It sits on the wall and testifies to the presence of two people. One person is a so-called criminal, one person is a so-called activist, and both are equal in their need to be recognized. One person has fame but faces jail; one person gets support and accolades from the community but wants fame. The wall could care less about either of them; It just gets fatter with paint.

Community Service is a project that poses the questions: If graffiti is painted in a way that serves a community is it wrong? And, why aren’t activists that make more of a mess painting over graffiti than the graffiti itself considered criminals?

I volunteered to paint over graffiti around the city, using my own supplies, to exploit the hypocrisy that people who put down one layer of paint are hated while the people who put down the next layer are celebrated. At the same time my mission was to paint my name in a bold and subtle style to demonstrate the effectiveness of getting over in a civic minded way. The answer, I suspected from the start, was the only thing more pointless than painting graffiti is painting over it.

Graffiti is far from pointless, though. It is an adventure that employs innovation and critical thinking skills all in one stylish line. Painting over it isn’t pointless either; it creates business and opportunities for hundreds of people all over LA.

There is an intense symbiotic relationship between the writers and the buffers, and at the end of the day, if everyone has done his job, One person has created a mark and another has covered it. So it is pointless, except for the decimal amount that graffiti abatement generates for the economy. That point moves steadily to the right morning, noon, and night.

via exteriorsurface

hahaha!
via vinebox:

hahaha!

via vinebox:

(via ifuckingwishh)

Clever.
@ eyemagazine

Clever.

@ eyemagazine

Prototyping iOS apps with Keynote

Keynote, which is essentially a Powerpoint alternative from Apple, makes it super-easy to animate your static mockups.

Now that you’ve decided to give it a go, the first step is to open Keynote and set the slide size to 640 by 1136 pixels[2]. Next, start creating slides for each “final state” of your prototype.

For example, there could be one slide for “share sheet down” and another for “share sheet up”.

This is what sets Keynote apart. “Magic Move” is a feature that makes it super simple to create custom animations that replicate the feel of native apps.

more at Medium

A nine-feet-long playable Roland TR-909 replica.

by Edinburgh arts collective Ray.

D0pe!

You have succeeded in life when all you really want is only what you really need.

Vernon Linwood Howard

L’Horizon.
Photography by Romain Laurent.

L’Horizon.

Photography by Romain Laurent.

via Visual Idiot

「NEON ME」app

via IMG SRC Group

Download the app